Sunday, June 14, 2009

False Analogies in Iran


Just to take a slight detour toward the serious, I've been watching news coverage of the post-election clashes in Iran, and all I can say is that sometimes reform is very, very difficult. I'm also thankful that I live in a country where we can bring about change without having to take to the streets.

Find out what this has to do with football after the hop.

The latest news from the NY Times is that Ahmadinejad was on television and compared the Iranian post-election protests to soccer riots:

“There will be rule of law in this country and all the people are equal before the law,” [Ahmadinejad] said. In a soccer match, he continued, “People may become excited and there may be confrontation between people and the police force. People who violate traffic violations will be fined by the police no matter who he is.”

What an interesting way to downplay the fact that you stole an election, huh? Although we take our football very seriously here, this analogy is completely off base. On the one hand, you have people fighting for freedom and democracy. On the other hand, you have a bunch of yobbos looking for an excuse to punch, kick and throw rocks. So, we will have to once again respectfully agree to disagree with "President" Ahmadinejad.

(photo: BBC)

17 comments:

Mosher said...

I have to say it's refreshing to see a population so concerned about the state of their country that they manage over 80% turnout for an election (however fraudulent the result may or may not have been).

We complain about the idiots in charge here, but barely managed 40% for the recent Euro poll - and that with local elections within England on the same day. Pathetic.

Spectator said...

@Mosher: Agree completely. We too often take our democracy for granted.

G said...

Someone is too young to remember the civil rights movement, eh?

I, too, wish the US had a percentage of participation that high. Electing a president with less than 50% voting has always bothered me.

And Iran is interesting - because women are legally barred from viewing football matches. Equal in the eyes of the law indeed.

jjf3 said...

Sky Sports just reported that Barcelona is in on Villa. Eto'o replacement?

phil said...

Well said, Mosher. Pisses me off.

Also, do we have to "respectfully agree to disagree" with Ahmadinejad?

Because I would like to summon the powers of Craig Bellamy and disagree with that motherf*cker as disrespectfully as possible.

jjf3 said...

I'm with you, phil. When the international polling observers are kept away, you haven't really had an election, and his veiled threat to the opposition leader (he's specifically refused to offer special protection for him) is just more of the same. Dear US government: stop going to war with people. People in developing countries WANT to be "westernized"/modernized/satellite TV/porn on demand. Quit fucking this up by giving them a reason not to...

Mike Georger said...

Considering how stupid more than half of this country is, the less uninterested people voting the better.

Yes, I am elitist as shit, but you live in central Pennsylvania and see if you don't grow to hate most people.

Ibracadabra said...

JJF3 -

You are right that many in developing countries may want to be westernized/modernized/porn on demand... but I'd much rather drop a few bombs on Ahmadinejad's nuclear reactors - because the last thing I want that guy to do is to turn reality into an episode of 24. So, yes, we should stop going to war with "people" around the world - but when those "people's rulers" are months away from a nuclear bomb, I change my tune.

PS Torres is sick & those SA horns have torn my ear drums to pieces.

Mosher said...

@Phil - not agreeing or disagreeing. I'm pleading ignorance in that I know nothing about the electoral candidates. Ask me about the political situation in Thailand and I'll give you an opinion, but I'm just not well-informed about Iran!

@Mike - many American friends have warned me about you Pennsylvanians ;)

jjf3 said...

The older I get (much too rapidly), the more I'm convinced that "America", as a homogenous whole (which I acknowledge it really isn't), is dumber than the dirt they stand on. Our education rewards memorization over critical thought, and the most "intelligent" job tracks are devalued, if not degraded, unless they generate large incomes as well.

Oh, and some need for false patriotism that goes against everything this country has ever stood for...

/old man rant
/how the fuck did I end up in TX?

jjf3 said...

Ibra: not an expert on Iran, but as far as I can tell he is nothing more than a mouthpiece for the mullahs who really "run" the country. This election was about internal politics, which is the only thing he could truly affect. The mullahs determine foreign policy, so while I agree that getting them to shut down their nuclear program is a priority, I see this particular election as having more to do with "westernizing" Iran as a whole, which would powerfully weaken said mullahs, which is why the election has turned into a fraud. "Iranians" don't hate America, the mullahs do. (and apologies to anyone Iranian or who knows this topic better than I do - just the impression I've gotten. I do not claim expertise...)

Mosher said...

jjf3 - at least Americans are allowed (nay, encouraged) to be patriotic. You can find yourself in court for flying an English flag in England, these days.

Those little trinkets you find in gift shops in Edinburgh? Made in Scotland. The similar things in Cardiff? Made in Wales. Sydney? Proudly Made in Australia by Australians from Australian Ingredients.

The few you find in London which aren't fabricated in Taiwan are "Made in Britain".

jjf3 said...

Mosher:
baseball teams, to this day (almost 8 years after 9/11), ask fans on Sundays (the fucking Yankees do it every freaking day) to stand and take off their hats for a rendition of "God Bless America", which is a) NOT the national anthem, and b) a pretty crappy song.
While I agree that patriotism is in general a good thing, any attempt at enforced patriotism is not. Then its a forced/mandated behavior, and says nothing about what anyone believes.
That said, I agree that this is kind of small in the grand scheme of things. But much like frogs in heated water, its the small advances that ultimately do the most damage...

jjf3 said...

oh, and since this is a footie site (and, surprisingly, not a political one): I think Tevez takes the money in Man City, and finds some weird way to wreck havoc on SAF. And I will be happy...

mosh said...

Given the current situation regarding my club, I'm trying to pretend that football doesn't exist until Mike Ashley gets his f*cking thumb out of his arse and finds someone to buy the sh*t pile he's created.

I am not holding my breath.

EbullientFatalist said...

Will not enter the fray re: Iranian democracy, but will contribute this:

I find it ironic that the two most vibrant democracies in the Middle East consist of our closest ally (Israel) and our most antagonistic enemy (Iran).

Mosher said...

Been to Israel - loved it. Not been to Iran and (like Georgia and parts of Korea) it seems like somewhere I should really have visited a year or so ago. Not likely to be much chance now.